Puppet Function: validate_re

Defined in:
modules/stdlib/lib/puppet/parser/functions/validate_re.rb
Function type:
Ruby 3.x API

Overview

validate_re()Any

The first argument of this function should be a string to test, and the second argument should be a stringified regular expression (without the // delimiters) or an array of regular expressions. If none of the regular expressions match the string passed in, compilation will abort with a parse error. If a third argument is specified, this will be the error message raised and seen by the user.

> Note: Compilation will also abort, if the first argument is not a String. Always use quotes to force stringification: validate_re(“$operatingsystemmajrelease”, '^[57]$')

Examples:

*Usage*

The following strings will validate against the regular expressions:

    validate_re('one', '^one$')
    validate_re('one', [ '^one', '^two' ])

The following strings will fail to validate, causing compilation to abort:

    validate_re('one', [ '^two', '^three' ])

A helpful error message can be returned like this:

    validate_re($::puppetversion, '^2.7', 'The $puppetversion fact value does not match 2.7')

Returns:

  • (Any)

    validation of a string against one or more regular expressions.



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# File 'modules/stdlib/lib/puppet/parser/functions/validate_re.rb', line 5

newfunction(:validate_re, :doc => <<-DOC
@summary
  Perform simple validation of a string against one or more regular
  expressions.

The first argument of this function should be a string to
test, and the second argument should be a stringified regular expression
(without the // delimiters) or an array of regular expressions.  If none
of the regular expressions match the string passed in, compilation will
abort with a parse error.
If a third argument is specified, this will be the error message raised and
seen by the user.

@return
  validation of a string against one or more regular expressions.

@example **Usage**
  The following strings will validate against the regular expressions:

      validate_re('one', '^one$')
      validate_re('one', [ '^one', '^two' ])

  The following strings will fail to validate, causing compilation to abort:

      validate_re('one', [ '^two', '^three' ])

  A helpful error message can be returned like this:

      validate_re($::puppetversion, '^2.7', 'The $puppetversion fact value does not match 2.7')

> *Note:*
Compilation will also abort, if the first argument is not a String. Always use
quotes to force stringification:
validate_re("${::operatingsystemmajrelease}", '^[57]$')
 DOC
           ) do |args|
  function_deprecation([:validate_re, 'This method is deprecated, please use the stdlib validate_legacy function,
                          with Stdlib::Compat::Re. There is further documentation for validate_legacy function in the README.'])

  if (args.length < 2) || (args.length > 3)
    raise Puppet::ParseError, "validate_re(): wrong number of arguments (#{args.length}; must be 2 or 3)"
  end

  raise Puppet::ParseError, "validate_re(): input needs to be a String, not a #{args[0].class}" unless args[0].is_a? String

  msg = args[2] || "validate_re(): #{args[0].inspect} does not match #{args[1].inspect}"

  # We're using a flattened array here because we can't call String#any? in
  # Ruby 1.9 like we can in Ruby 1.8
  raise Puppet::ParseError, msg unless [args[1]].flatten.any? do |re_str|
    args[0] =~ Regexp.compile(re_str)
  end
end